252-512-2215 info@wymancomm.net
This is my story.

Having been in the industrial technology sector for so long, this could be a very long post. Instead, I’ll attempt to make this a summary. Anyone who would like greater details after reading this is, of course welcome to contact me.

Here’s where I get to talk about what I’ve done, what I’ve learned, and where I’ve been.  This is useful information for those of you who may be trying to decide if I’d be the right person to put on our city council. Once I started writing this, I realized it could get to be quite a bit to read, so I’ve divided this into two parts. Here goes Part 1… (you can click over to Part 2 here)

My time in the Air Force had me involved in the Electronic Counter Measures that the F-4 Phantom jet used.  “Counter Measures” are the signals that a fighter jet emits in order to confuse enemy radar.  This was late ‘60’s – early ‘70’s. There is an old Chinese curse, “May you live in interesting times…”. As you can imagine, those were very interesting years.

I transitioned into civilian life working for GTE Sylvania, building the solid-state control systems that ran their machinery. They used that machinery to manufacture flash cubes. Does anyone remember “flash cubes”?

After a short time with that company (remember, these were my early days and I was quite eager for new adventures!), I took a position with a small, privately owned company that was manufacturing audio cassettes.  Remember those?  We had less than 100 employees at that time, and only a few of us were engineers.  We were tasked with developing automated machinery to allow us to produce those cassettes more efficiently. Having been successful at creating systems that could produce a million audio cassettes per week, our company grew and branched out into other product lines.

I grew with that company. In the eleven years with that company, I progressed from engineer to project management, and then on to division management, during which time, the company grew to over 2,500 employees.  By then, the company had manufacturing facilities in Northeastern US, Tucson AZ, Curacao, Wales, and sales across North America, South America, and Western Europe. The company expanded its product line to include video cassettes, CD’s, DVD’s, ink cartridges, and IBM data cartridges.

While video cassettes were still the rage, I took a partner in another business venture and we built a company that provided video duplication services.  In other words, we recorded the programs on those cassettes.  I was still working for the other company at the time, so I was quite busy.

By then, it was 1987 and I had become acquainted with the owners of a company based in London. I became Technical Director for this company, which produced equipment for copying video cassettes on a mass scale. Our customers were in several countries in Western Europe, in the U.S., Canada, Australia, Singapore, Japan, well, you get the idea. That’s because our clients were companies like Warner Bros., Sony, Technicolor, and other major content producers.

You can imagine that these clients were very demanding and I was responsible for making sure our technology was sound. As a result, I knew I could be tested and not only survive, but also grow. I found that, during that time, I had morphed my job into one that had me branding and promoting the company. I was well traveled, and had developed an understanding of what attracts clients and keeps them.

By the mid-90’s, I had run into an old colleague and friend from my audio cassette days. This was during an industry trade conference, and he explained he had built his own company back in the U.S. He said his was a small group of primarily engineers who had created a unique product and he was sure the industry would benefit from it. He just needed help marketing it and he challenged me to take this on.

So, moving back to the country that gave me my first opportunities, I spent fifteen years with this company, creating a brand for them and marketing their products throughout the world. The company produced custom engineered machinery for installing anti-theft devices found in consumer products, and I was their Sales and Marketing Director. You may be familiar with the small white tags that trigger the alarms at Walmart and other retailers. We acquired clients such as Sony, Warner Brothers, Technicolor, Polygram, and I managed sales and service agencies on four continents.

A few of the products we marketed internationally

Not too many years ago, I transitioned to working with individual clients, mostly in the industry with which I was most familiar and formed Wyman Marketing Concepts.

Over the years, I had learned that I’m able to study a business and understand the best, most cost effective ways to present that business to its customers.

I work with clients one on one and develop a plan specifically for that client.

That’s it for Part 1.  Next, I’ll explore how my history and acquired skills will make me an effective city councilor.

Click here for Part 2!

See More Examples

I'd love to hear from you...

It doesn’t matter where you live in Washington…

City Councilors represent all of our residents in all precincts.

Everything I do as your councilor will be with that in mind.

Can I count on your vote?

Are there issues you’re concerned about?

Do you have suggestions for my campaign?

Whether you have questions, concerns, or you’re ready to help my campaign, I’d love to hear from you!

Contact Roland

4 + 2 =

Contact Roland Wyman

Let me know if you'd like me to call or email back!

Share This
%d bloggers like this: